What Do We Write?

Moleskine_2_t_1

"Blackbird’s comment about Moleskine’s being "just another notebook"  is something that I think is true in spirit but not literally.  I’ve had various flavors of pocket notebooks throughout my days in attempts for journaling, sketching, organizing, archiving, etc. Notebooks I used were purposely "just another notebook"s,  basically any old notebook that I happened to have. Some were government issue record and memo books, some were $2 notepads I picked up in a Chinese store, some were in the office supply cabinet, some from the local sundry store, and occasionally a nicely covered notebook that looked pretty. One thing in common with all of these (outside of some sketchbooks) was that they never get fully filled, and in fact some barely rate partially filled.  On a wierd binge for self-improvement, I purchased a Moleskine.  And I marvel at something I never realized before; this is a quality product. A lot of little things that I thought I would never notice or care about were immediatly apparent, and surprisingly so for me since I didn’t think the little black book was such a big deal appearance-wise. However, I did notice the following:  A) the binding allows for it to lay open flat, or mostly so.  Spirals annoyed my be eventually having bent springs, book-bound ones I had to hold open, even other sewn bound notebooks. B) the elastic band and envelope are just really convenient, and now I practically demand them in a pocket notebook.  C) the paper is quality. I was surprised that manual writing was almost pleasurable with even a cheapy ball-point pen.  D) the size is right, I can throw in index cards and stick it in my pocket.  I do wish there was an identical moleskine with a slightly more flexible cover out though.  Anyhow, I came to the conclusion that not all notebooks are created equal, it just so happened that the Moleskine was the first quality notebook I purchased.  Perhaps others are like quality and convenience are available in which case it would be just another "quality" notebook.  But I’m certain that these other books aren’t any cheaper than Moleskines since I usually avoided them at the stores thinking that "it’s just another notebook".

A side effect of the quality is that I feel more inclined to use my notebook, pick it up, think about what I want to put in it.  In any task, tools DO matter, since good tools facilitate (or encourage) the task (or behavior) better than bad ones.  As for the perceived snobbery, that’s another matter entirely.  The PR/advert campaign appealing to the snobbery probably applies I’ll admit."

Milesh in "What Do We Write"
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