In Praise of Paper

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"When I began writing scripts in the early 80s, ‘cut and paste’ meant a pair of scissors and Pritt stick BUT I had a secretary to type up my scrawl. Today I couldn’t work without my Powerbook and the Internet, but for personal stuff, it’s pen and paper everytime! (even this intro was drafted on paper!)

It’s a natural and intuitive way of developing ideas, and it’s really accessible: you never know, in years to come, your family may want to know about you, and when they do, you can guarantee they won’t have a floppy disk drive to hand!!! Paper may have changed colour, ink faded, but they’ll still be able to enjoy what’s written. Zip discs? CDs? yeah sure.

Apart from pure pleasure, there are other good reasons for using a slower approach. Twenty years ago, an Independent journalist argued that ‘word processors’ were the worst thing to hit creative writing as they gave a document an ‘appearance’ of professionalism, whatever the words said- a classic case of the triumph of form over content! However when words have to be chosen and formed, rather than simply bashed out on a computer keyboard, it’s bound to produce better work. When you can redraft a document on a PC quicker than you can say liquid paper correction, then why bother to be careful?!…"

Rowland K. Jones
Visit reallyaccessiblememory
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One Response to In Praise of Paper

  1. Vanessa says:

    Speaking of writing instruments I thought I’d mention that the LA Times Sunday magazine “west” featured several lovely articles regarding writing in the Style section. The three articles: The Beauty of Writing, Pen Pointers and Pencil Pusher. It made me so very glad that I decided to treat myself to the LA Times yesterday in addition to my usual must haves for Sunday mornings: NY Times and SF Chronicle. Elizabeth Khuri (The Beauty of Writing) eloquently wrote, “When you sit in front of a computer you think differently; when you are sitting with a fountain pen, it pours out of the depths of who you are.”

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