Angelina Jolie’s Notebook

Ajl5

Photo: Per-Anders Pettersson / © Getty Images

Ajl2

Video courtesy of UNHCR ©

March 11, 2007 – Angelina Jolie began traveling as a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations some six years ago. She has visited the victims of violence in Africa, Pakistan and Cambodia—first as an observer in the background, then using her fame to draw attention to the plight of the helpless. The movie star spoke to NEWSWEEK’s Christopher Dickey about her recent trip to a camp housing Darfur refugees in Chad, her response to critics of ‘celebrity tourism’ and why she and Brad Pitt like their current home in New Orleans.

Read the full story at MSNBC

Related link:
The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

[Thanks Elisa!]

Print it in Moleskine MSK format
This entry was posted in My Moleskine. Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to Angelina Jolie’s Notebook

  1. Sylvia says:

    Never mind Van Gogh, if Angelina uses a moleskine I’m sold! ;)

  2. Peggy says:

    I’m sorry but, seeing a moleskine next to Angelie Jolie as she plays celebrity tourist in Africa makes me want to toss all of mine in the garbage. She may have just ruined my love of moleskine.

  3. Sylvia says:

    Isn’t it terrible to see celebrities using their fame to draw attention to serious world issues that most people weren’t aware of? The nerve!
    /sarcasm

  4. Peggy says:

    It’s amazing she only began to care about “serious world issues” after she had been called a “crazy, man stealing blood wearing nut”. Now she’s Mother Theresa. If she wants to be taken seriously, have her spend years getting a degree in social work or diplomacy, spend years working in the state department for $40,000 a year and actually put herself in “real” danger living in a camp. Then I’ll take her seriously. Until then, I’ll just read the newspaper like any other intelligent person to be informed about these issues.

  5. MTA says:

    So what did YOU do for the world today? Oh, that’s right, you read the newspaper.

  6. Emily says:

    I don’t see why “getting a degree” is a necessary step in trying to help others. Just because she hasn’t sat through all the lectures and written all the dissertations doesn’t mean she can’t care about people, and it doesn’t mean she can’t make a huge difference.

  7. Don Murphy says:

    Well, if I ever needed a reason to quit using these, she just provided it. But then again, so have many of the utterly useless oxygen absorbers we call celebrities. I still like the books. They even won a fierce, soul splitting battle for my attentions over the Circa line…

  8. deadmuse says:

    I use Moleskines because they’re designed well and conducive to writing. I never cared that the brand was touted as the brand of Hemingway, Picasso, etc (which is a fabrication anyway).

    Why should any of us care if writers or artists or celebrities use them? If you toss your Moleskines because Angelina uses them, are you admitting you only had them in the first place because of the more glamorous artist/ writer association? That’s the kind of superficial attitude celebrties have been associated with in some of these comments.

    As for Angelina–she is certainly not as knowledgable about global issues as an expert, but that’s not her job. Celebrities have enormous influence and wealth and she in one of the very few to use those for good. So what if she’s not perfect? She’s still doing more than most of us.

  9. Peggy says:

    Lets see, what did I do for the world today? I worked 12 hours at my normal job. Getting paid for only 8. Then I spent 2 hours fixing the PCs for a non-profit organization in my neighborhood. Then, before bed, I totally rebuilt a PC for free for my elderly neighbor who can’t afford to buy a new one. Sorry, I didn’t have much time to jet off to the Sudan, maybe next week. I didn’t have time to read the newspaper today.

  10. Fay says:

    Well I work 12-16 hour days for a non-profit organization and also only get paid for 8. Give my money to various charitable organizations. But, I would never have the audacity to think just because of what I do I would be better than someone else who is trying to help those less fortunate. I applaud Angelina Jolie for all the tireless work she has done for women and children around the world. And she has put that Moleskine to good use. I find her notes, which are included in her book “Notes from My Travels” and posted on UNHCR’s website, very enlightening and also heartbreaking. Also, if you bothered to read her diaries you would understand she wasn’t living like a movie star when she visited those refugee camps. Quite the contrary.

  11. Melissa says:

    FYI…
    #1 – Angelina was asked to be a UN Ambassador long before the whole Brad thing happened (2005). Her book was published in 2003 and she began her travels before 2001. (All this can be found by merely reading the foreword of Angelina’s book.)
    #2 – I repeat, Angelina was ASKED to be a UN Ambassador, therefore she’s not ‘throwing’ her celebrity around at all. You want celebs to stop acting so elite? Then treat them as you would any other human being. And all human beings have the right to care about world issues.
    #3 – This is a site about moleskine journals and so all said whining about celebrities and world issues are pretty much irrelevant. That is, unless you really are shallow enough to base your consumeristic habits on celebrity (or lack of) endorsements.

  12. adam says:

    amen, fay. let’s perpetuate good feelings. being an active community volunteer is just as noble as being an ambassador to third world countries- i think as long as you’re not out there spreading hate and violence around, you’re fine by me. however we live our lives, we all have moleskines in common- see how they bring us together?

  13. Sophie Brown says:

    I agree with Fay. Saves me from being long-winded. But this raises an unattractive point about the Moleskine “community” that has bothered me for a couple of years now. They are the best notebooks going, and I love them. I’ve been using them for 10 years. That’s point 1. Then the company has gotten so much free publicity by artists somehow convinced into using their talent to promote the company (this is more easily overlooked but contributes to the “fad”), point 2.

    Then what I really hate is all of the faddish love for a product which far exceeds the product itself. “I’m going to throw them out because the image somehow doesn’t conform to the elitest qualities that I give these notebooks. I’m so cool and hip because I use these notebooks. If Van Gogh were alive today maybe he would consent to using his name to promote these notebooks…”

    I tend to wonder if what people actually WRITE ranks as much in importance in their minds if they’re ready to scap it all because an actress uses the same product. What if she uses the same laundry detergent or happens to like the same book? But that’s not a part of your IDENTITY, right? I’m hooked on it too but that sounds so flaky and unattractive.

    I like Angelina Jolie and that’s not the point. And actually the romantic idea of Moleskine and TRAVEL fits right in with this. The nomad aspect. Which is all part of the advertising circular everyone is so fond of. It’s an ADVERTISING CIRCULAR. It’s a pack of lies and it’s brilliant. But it’s promoted this FAD, a bubble that will eventually burst. The industry of “gourmet notebooks” has been launched. These are mass-produced products. Using them doesn’t make you special. Maybe you can throw them away because you haven’t put anything interesting in them anyway.

    So go build computers for the indigent and leave the hard stuff for people who need a serious workshop for their writing. Or buy Rhodia or Circa and stand on your own as a person without the benefit of a particular brand of paper. Because it’s not that interesting anymore.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.

I accept Privacy policy and Terms of use